Although of course you end up becoming yourself (book reaction)

I’ll admit it: He’s gone by choice, which makes his thoughts more interesting to me. Let’s get that out of the way. Beyond the intrigue of understanding a person who chooses to end his own life, and the being-human fascination of finding clues in his writing or interviews, and the knowledge that there are no words beyond those he’s left, David Foster Wallace is interesting because he was a damned rewarding thinker to process. So I was surprised when I discovered I liked him less after reading Rolling Stone writer David Lipsky’s transcription of their time together in 1996 at … Keep goin’

Urban forest cob experiment, part VIII: another brick in the wall

As I work week after week on a thick brick wall, I must keep the end product in mind. It’s easy to get tired or discouraged when the work is slow and you are a one-person team, but I enjoy the work overall and listening to podcasts that interview authors, scientists, artists, comedians, and everyday-womans/mens. Still thinking of later in the process, I’ve saved about four wine bottles, all green, with this in mind: I need to start buying differently colored bottles of cheap wine.  Any recommendations? I’m also thinking of putting one of my old snare drums in the … Keep goin’

Bringing #Comments to life

Almost two years ago, after winter drinks with a couple of friends, I came home and read an article about the deliciousness of a vegan mayo, Vegenaise. The article was positive, and I was feeling happy that a vegan product got such a great review. And then I scrolled down to the … Comments (Deep, booming voice here.) As usual, all who commented were kind, considerate, and thereby restored my faith in humanity. Um, no. Always disheartening, never productive, comments have a way of encouraging — what’s the opposite of “faith”? — disbelief in humanity. It occurred to me that, … Keep goin’

Urban Forest Cob Experiment, part VII: foundation half finished

What was that idiom: “Rome wasn’t built in a day?” I’m co-oping that to explain the lengthy time it’s taken to build the foundation, but changing it to more adequately reflect my building skills to “The Pinto wasn’t built in a month.” Though Romans did use a form of concrete (which has lasted to present day), the Pinto most decidedly did not. However, since its recall in the 1970s for the little explosion problem, it has made many top 50 lists (as the worst car of all time).   But how could you resist this family cruising wagon version of … Keep goin’